Indubitably.'s avatar

Indubitably.

theappleppielifestyle

Imagine this:
Instead of waiting in her tower, Rapunzel slices off her long, golden hair with a carving knife, and then uses it to climb down to freedom.
Just as she’s about to take the poison apple, Snow White sees the familiar wicked glow in the old lady’s eyes, and slashes the evil queen’s throat with a pair of sewing scissors.
Cinderella refuses everything but the glass slippers from her fairy godmother, crushes her stepmother’s windpipe under her heel, and the Prince falls madly in love with the mysterious girl who dons rags and blood-stained slippers.

Imagine this:
Persephone goes adventuring with weapons hidden under her dress.
Persephone climbs into the gaping chasm.
Or, Persephone uses her hands to carve a hole down to hell.
In none of these versions is Persephone’s body violated unless she asks Hades to hold her down with his horse-whips.
Not once does she hold out on eating the pomegranate, instead biting into it eagerly and relishing the juice running down her chin, staining it red.
In some of the stories, Hades never appears and Persephone rules the underworld with a crown of her own making.
In all of them, it is widely known that the name Persephone means Bringer of Destruction.

Imagine this:
Red Riding Hood marches from her grandmother’s house with a bloody wolf pelt.
Medusa rights the wrongs that have been done to her.
Eurydice breaks every muscle in her arms climbing out of the land of the dead.

Imagine this:
Girls are allowed to think dark thoughts, and be dark things.

Imagine this:
Instead of the dragon, it’s the princess with claws and fiery breath
who smashes her way from the confines of her castle
and swallows men whole.

'Reinventing Rescuing,' theappleppielifestyle. (via justawordshaker)

Roald Dahl wrote the Red Riding Hood one, at least: http://24.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_mb4th6nEGh1qe7czqo1_500.jpg

(via ninniknishukan)

On Snow, leadership, and purity: why she must un-learn to be a good queen in order to be a great one

Snow’s attitude has bothered me more and more as S2 wears on, but it wasn’t until The Miller’s Daughter that I realized why.

Read More

Last night’s episode made me realize that one of the biggest things I’m missing in season two is the relationship between Mary Margaret and Emma. With the curse breaking, so too vanished the warmth, closeness, and camaraderie that Mary Margaret and Emma shared in season one. There’s a wall between them now, and in a way Emma is as isolated as she was at the beginning of last season.

She doesn’t have a peer to confide in because Snow no longer sees her that way, nor does Snow allow Emma to approach her on that level. I’m sure Emma would love to sit down with a neutral party and hash out her feelings about the drastic turn her life has taken, but all she has is Snow brushing off her concerns with OMG YOU’RE MY DAUGHTER AND NOTHING ELSE MATTERS LET ME LOVE YOU FOREVER MY BABY . It would have been nice if the writers could have introduced one of the second or third tier characters as Mary Margaret’s replacement in Emma’s life, so that Emma could have a friend AND a family.

taijavigilia

(via batmanmonroe)

yudiart

yudiart:

Just as a reference, my whole Gender Reversed Fairy Tale Series together (at last)!

Sleeping Beauty, Rapunzel, Tarzana and John, Little Red Cap, Snow White, Beau and the Beast, The Little Merman, and Cinderfella.

All silkscreens. 6 - 10 colors.  Editions of 20 and 30.  Yudi Chen 2012.  

j-scott-campbell.deviantart.com

(via batmanmonroe)

fuckyeahvintageillustration

fuckyeahvintageillustration:

‘Sprookjes van Moeder de Gans (Tales from Mother Goose)’, illustrated by Rie Cramer. Published 1916 by Sr. W de Haan, Utrecht.

Source

etsy.com

fairytalemood:

A Grimm Christmas card set by Lane Garrison

(via batmanmonroe)

petitetiaras
Snow White, Cinderella, AuroraArielBelleJasminePocahontasMulanGiselleTianaRapunzelMerida

I just noticed that all of the Disney princesses break the rule of “don’t count hair as part of a character silhouette.” With different hairstyles, the princesses would be indistinguishable in silhouette form. (Except for Pocahontas)

(via petitetiaras)

jwtroemner:

anursingdegreeinfeelings:

#This is where Emma gets her chivalry #Not Charming who pushes distraught women

I really wonder about what that says about their respective backgrounds.
Charming was a shepherd. Now, for a shepherd, he was a pretty damn sweet guy. He honestly was charming, but he was also raised in a rough life, among rough people, doing hard physical work all the time. It was expected of him to be as rough and hands on as his father might have been.
Snow, being a princess, was taught ettiquette. She was thrown down into the real world, in much the same way and the same amount of time that Charming was elevated to royalty. She gained the boldness, brashness and kick-assery necessary  to survive in that world, but at the same time she never lost the poise or elegance she was raised to display. 
In short, I guess, it feels odd to fault him for being less familiar than her with a system of etiquette she was raised in, while he was only a guest. 
That doesn’t make Snow any less awesome for it, of course. She could easily have been hardened and corroded by her time in exile, but instead she remains gentle and kind, acting as a friend and almost motherly figure to the woman who tried to murder her. That’s not chivalry right there— that’s enough to get you nominated for freakin’ sainthood.

jwtroemner:

anursingdegreeinfeelings:

#This is where Emma gets her chivalry #Not Charming who pushes distraught women

I really wonder about what that says about their respective backgrounds.

Charming was a shepherd. Now, for a shepherd, he was a pretty damn sweet guy. He honestly was charming, but he was also raised in a rough life, among rough people, doing hard physical work all the time. It was expected of him to be as rough and hands on as his father might have been.

Snow, being a princess, was taught ettiquette. She was thrown down into the real world, in much the same way and the same amount of time that Charming was elevated to royalty. She gained the boldness, brashness and kick-assery necessary  to survive in that world, but at the same time she never lost the poise or elegance she was raised to display. 

In short, I guess, it feels odd to fault him for being less familiar than her with a system of etiquette she was raised in, while he was only a guest. 

That doesn’t make Snow any less awesome for it, of course. She could easily have been hardened and corroded by her time in exile, but instead she remains gentle and kind, acting as a friend and almost motherly figure to the woman who tried to murder her. That’s not chivalry right there— that’s enough to get you nominated for freakin’ sainthood.

(via thief-in-the-dark)